Oven Baby Back Ribs with Hoisin-Bourbon Sauce

By Sally Cameron on May 30, 2011

beef & pork,

10 Comments

Baby-Back-Ribs-32632

There’s something about the flavor of charred meat that makes our primal instincts kick in. Fire and meat equals wonderful flavors. With summer cooking and grilling ahead, certain dishes capture the essence and enjoyment of summer. Baby back ribs, coated with a caramelized Chinese-inspired barbecue sauce, is one of them. Best served with plenty of napkins.

Adapting Mom’s Recipe

With smoky flavor and a finger-licking barbecue sauce, pork ribs are irresistible. By adapting my mom’s recipe, starting ribs in the oven and finishing them on the grill, you can have delicious, easy to prepare baby back ribs in under an hour and a half.

For folks in some parts of the country barbecue is practically a religion. Doing ribs anyway but “low and slow” on a smoker would be unthinkable. I don’t have a smoker (yet) in my backyard to do the traditional slow-cooked style and not often the hours it may take, but my adapted recipe tastes terrific in a relatively short timeframe. No matter if you have a big oven and grill or a small oven and grill on an apartment balcony, you can make tasty ribs.

Citrus, Lemon, Onion and Spices

My mom started her pork spareribs in an electric skillet. She covered them with thinly sliced onion and lemon and finished them on the grill. For my version, I prefer leaner, baby back ribs and season them with kosher salt, smoked black pepper and granulated garlic. I top the ribs with orange, lemon and onion slices and squeeze on some extra orange juice.

Wrap and Bake

Wrapped in a heavy foil packet and placed on a sheet tray, the ribs bake for about an hour. They come out tender and juicy, ready to be finished on the grill, slathered in barbecue sauce.

As a note, when you unwrap the ribs from the foil there will be delicious juices accumulated. Pour them into a cup and save them in case you need to thin the barbecue sauce.

Chinese-Style Barbecue Sauce

My sauce recipe for ribs is based on Chinese Hoisin sauce. I add orange juice, garlic, ginger, smoked spices, espresso powder and spirits – either dark rum, Bourbon or whiskey. This is a good time to order the smoked spices I’ve mentioned in previous posts, as they add to the smoky flavor. If you don’t have the smoked spices, make the ribs anyway with the regular version of the spices. You can order smoked spices from the Chefs Warehouse and from Savory Spice Shop.

After baking in the oven, finish your ribs on a hot grill over low heat for about 20-25 minutes. Turn your rib racks about every 5-7 minutes, brushing with barbecue sauce. You want a good coating of sauce to caramelize on the ribs. Remove from the grill, slice and enjoy.

How Much to Buy

On quantity, I buy ¾ to 1 pound per person of baby back ribs. It will depend on the size of the appetite and what you are serving along side. Anyway, just enjoy. And be sure to offer plenty of napkins. These really are finger-licking good.

 

Related Recipes

10 Comments

Leave a Comment
Ang | June 7, 2011 at 4:54 am

I came across your blog on a friends FB page, and the sight of these ribs have me salivating as I type. I would love to make these for my Moms Birthday coming up:)

Razorblogger | June 7, 2011 at 6:33 pm

I think the pictures look awesome. The sauce sounds amazing. I think letting the meat get to room temperature “is asking for trouble”, i think keeping meat at a cool temperature. Beneficial to keeping away bacteria that will turn your dish. Check out my tasty baby backs with Kansas Style BBQ sauce. They were a crowd pleaser.

    Sally | June 8, 2011 at 1:18 am

    Dear Razorblogger. I’m glad you commented so I can clarify something for everyone about meat temperatures. Allowing meat to sit out for 45 minutes is completely safe. What you are doing is allowing the meat to get the chill off. It will roast better and you’ll get better results. It’s not really coming to room temperature. No fears about food safety. I’m Food Safe Certified and am very careful about such things. Now if you let it sit out for several hours, there could be issues.

    The temperature danger zone is 41 degrees to 135 degrees. When food is in that range for more than four hours pathogens can grow to high enough levels to cause illness. Thanks again for the comment. Good chance to help everyone learn. Here is a link to more info on food safety. http://www.foodsafety.gov/.

Vicki Bensinger | July 30, 2011 at 1:59 pm

These sound delicious and look so pretty with the sliced oranges. I do something similar but not with the oranges. I’ll have to try that.

OlegT | November 8, 2011 at 2:00 pm

Sally you said to put it in the over for 50-60 minutes, My questions is will I be able to leave it in for lets say hour and a half for more tender ribs or that’s perfect the way you have it. I don’t have much experience in cooking ribs
Thank you,

    Sally | November 8, 2011 at 11:11 pm

    Hi Oleg. If you are cooking baby back ribs, the hour should be plenty. I don’t think another 30 minutes would give you much in terms of additional tenderness. Please let me know how they come out. And thanks for the comment.

CestKoi | November 13, 2011 at 8:53 pm

I made those ribs last night for my brother’s family and they were a success! Thank you for sharing this recipe

    Sally | November 13, 2011 at 8:55 pm

    I’m so glad they were a hit. Thanks for sharing. I love to hear that!

Sawyer | October 20, 2012 at 9:14 pm

I made these tonight and they were a HUGE success… my first time I’ve ever made ribs, and I’ll use this recipe forever. They were gone in a blink of an eye. I didn’t use baby back ribs because the store didn’t have them, but I used regular back ribs. These clearly took longer to cook but I took them out after 60 minutes after some color came into the meat and put them on the grill, which made them perfect. The flavor was amazing and it was incredibly tender and juicy. Thanks so much for this awesome recipe!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *