Strawberries with Balsamic Syrup

Strawberries with Balsamic Syrup

By Sally Cameron on April 29, 2012

dessert, gluten-free, sauces and condiments, the daniel plan, vegan,


Berries and vinegar might sound like odd partners, but they’re actually wonderful together. When you combine sweet spring strawberries with a reduction of Balsamic vinegar, the flavors are fantastic, making for an easy and healthy dessert.

By My Stove

By the side of my stove sits a platter filled with basic things that I use constantly in cooking. Olive oil, coconut oil, a variety of salts and pepper, and a little squeeze bottle filled with an intensely flavored brown syrup. That syrup is Balsamic vinegar reduced with a tiny bit of brown sugar.

How to Use Balsamic Reduction (Syrup)

Balsamic reduction is useful in so many ways.

  • Squirt a little over roast green beans and onions or other roast vegetables to dress before serving
  • Add a squiggly line to dress a plate, like in a fancy restaurant
  • Drip it onto toasted baguette smeared with soft goat cheese for an appetizer (add figs if in season)
  • Use it as a sauce for roast or grilled salmon or chicken
  • Garnish pureed soups
  • Squirt over a classic Caprese salad of sliced tomatoes, mozzarella and basil leaves with some good olive oil
  • Drizzle over fresh, sweet strawberries for a fantastic and healthy dessert (over vanilla ice cream too)

Choosing Balsamic

Balsamic vinegar comes in a range of prices and qualities from the cheap imitation stuff to highly prized, aged bottles.

For a reduction, choose at the lower end of the price scale but still a decent quality. And be sure to read the label. You don’t want to buy a bottle with caramel coloring or anything added.

One label I read had a warning label that it contained lead. I buy organic balsamic vinegar. The Whole Foods 365 brand is good and inexpensive, but there are many options.

Simply reduce Balsamic vinegar by half, simmering in a small saucepan with a little brown sugar. As the vinegar reduces, it thickens. It will thicken further upon cooling into a syrup. Pour into a squeeze bottle or a small jar with a tight lid. No refrigeration is needed.

Balsamic Syrup Reduction|

About Strawberries and Pesticides

For strawberries, I only buy organic.  They taste better and reduce your exposure to pesticides. If you can only find conventionally grown strawberries, the benefits of eating fruits and vegetables outweigh the risks.

The Environmental Working Group publishes an annual Shoppers Guide to highlight which fruits and vegetables have the most pesticide residues and are the most important to buy organic.

You can reduce your pesticide exposure by avoiding what the EWG lists on their “dirty dozen” list. The “clean fifteen” list is there too.

Helpful Links


Leave a Comment
Sally | April 30, 2012 at 4:18 am

Just in time for strawberry season–well, almost. We won’t see berries for at least 6 to 8 weeks, BUT your recommendation of brands is very helpful, and it’s never too soon to make this reduction. Also, thanks for the link to shopper’s guide. Great information and lovely recipe, Sally!

Margaret | April 30, 2012 at 4:00 pm

The photos look beautiful – I can’t wait to try the recipe! How delicious.

Debs @ The Spanish Wok | May 1, 2012 at 4:06 am

I love balsamic reduction, not put sugar in before though; will have to give that a try next time thanks for the tip.

I’ve never quite got my head around balsamic with strawbs though LOL.

BTW You are welcome to join in my monthly food blogger event THE SOUP KITCHEN, here offering a new theme each month. All bloggers are welcome, hope to see you participate soon.

Madonna | May 1, 2012 at 9:38 am

I am always looking for that extra touch to give my food that memorable something, Something that makes the family go wow, and here it is. Lovely photos. I am making this for Mother’s Day.

Leo | Fontaneria | November 26, 2012 at 11:48 am

the photos are excellent

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