Maple Glazed Pecans

By Sally Cameron on November 14, 2015

appetizers & snacks, Featured 2, holiday dishes, thanksgiving, the daniel plan,

5 Comments

Crunchy, rich, and lightly sweet with warm spices. From breakfast through afternoon snacks, cocktail hour and dinner, these maple glazed pecans are versatile. The only downside is they are dangerously delicious.

maple glazed pecans | AFoodCentricLife.com

Maple Glazed Pecans

For the past nine years I’ve catered a fancy dinner party for a favorite client every October. We always do a harvest salad with fall flavors, including pomegranate seeds, a cheese of cheese of some sort (goat, blue or brie), apple or pear wedges and toasted pecans.

This year I wanted to spice things up a bit, and baked these spiced maple pecans for an even tastier salad.

How to Glaze Pecans

Melt butter with maple syrup, brown sugar, olive oil, a pinch of salt and spices in a wide pan. Add pecan halves and stir to coat. Scatter the nuts onto a parchment lined baking sheet in a single layer and bake for 15 minutes in the oven. The nuts will crisp as they cool.

maple glazed pecans|AFoodCentricLife.com

Spice Options

For spices, I use Pumpkin Pie Spice Blend from Savory Spice Shop. It’s a heavenly aromatic combination of Saigon cinnamon, Indonesian cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, mace, allspice and cloves. Create you own blend or buy one.

But What About the Sugar?

With many of us actively reducing sugar in our diet, beware that anything with “glazed” in the title usually has sugar.

My maple glazed pecans are not as sugar coated or as sweet as many recipes. Second, it takes approximately 21 pecan halves to make up a full ounce. That’s a generous handful of pecans. Far more than you need for a salad.

A half ounce of nuts (about 10) has just 1.6 grams of sugar, and 109 calories.

maple glazed pecans|AFoodCentricLife.com

Ingredient Tips

For brown sugar, use a natural, organic brown sugar, not a fake brown sugar that is really just white sugar with added molasses and coloring. For maple syrup, get the real deal, not the fake stuff that is nothing but artificially colored corn syrup. Grade B maple has a richer, stronger flavor.

What to Do With Maple Glazed Pecans

  • Toss a few into a salad for richness
  • Chopped and sprinkle over baby green beans or Brussels sprouts
  • Chop and garnish soup
  • Add a few to morning steel cut oats
  • Enjoy a small handful at cocktail hour
  • Package a batch or even a half batch in a decorative jar as a housewarming gift

maple glazed pecans|AFoodCentricLife.com

New! Nutrition Labels

When you learn to eat a balanced, healthy diet and make smart choices that work for your body, you don’t have to track every single thing that you eat. Constantly trying to track numbers will make you crazy. Having said that,  I do realize that labels can be a helpful point of reference.

Up until now I have not included nutrition labels for my recipes but realize that many people still want to see the nutritional info. I’ve found a new tool that makes analyzing and creating labels easy.

Will showing these labels help you? Would you like me to keep doing this? Please comment and let me know. Note – I have not yet figured out how to get the serving to show up. It’s 1/2 ounce or 10 nuts. I’m working on it.

maple glazed pecans nutrition

Print Recipe

Maple Glazed Pecans

Crunchy, rich, and lightly sweet with pumpkin pie spices, toss these maple glazed pecans on a salad, snack on them at cocktail hour, package up a jar as a housewarming or holiday gift or add a few chopped to oatmeal or baby green beans.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 tablespoons maple syrup grade B is richer
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice blend see post
  • 2 pinches  of sea salt
  • 1 pound raw pecan halves

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat an oven to 300°F (convection) or 325°F standard oven (will depend on your oven). Over medium low heat in a medium sauté pan or skillet (or microwave), melt butter, maple syrup, olive oil, brown sugar, spice and salt. Melt and stir until smooth. Add pecans and stir to coat evenly.
  2. Spread nuts on rimmed baking sheet lined with baking parchment or foil. Bake until nuts are golden brown and you can smell the spices, about 15 minutes. Do not let them get too dark. Allow nuts to cool. They will crisp upon cooling. Package in an airtight container.
  3. Nutritional analysis per serving (1/2 ounce or 10 nuts): calories 109, fat 11 g, saturated fat 1.2 g, cholesterol 1 mg, fiber 1.4 g, protein 1.3 g, carbohydrate 3.1 g, sugar 1.6 g, sodium 0 mg

Recipe Notes

For spices, I use Pumpkin Pie Spice Blend from Savory Spice Shop. It's a heavenly aromatic combination of Saigon cinnamon, Indonesian cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, mace, allspice and cloves. Create your own blend or buy one.

5 Comments

Leave a Comment
Kathy | 11/15/2015 at 9:24 am

Yes, thank you for the nutritional information. I am diabetic and following The Daniel Plan. It is always helpful to have the nutritional info so I can fit your recipes into my food plan.

Patsy | 11/15/2015 at 1:55 pm

Really appreciate the nutritional info.

Madonna/aka/Ms. Lemon | 11/15/2015 at 4:28 pm

I could eat that whole jar. 🙂

Anne | 11/16/2015 at 7:01 am

Thank you for great recipes. Please continue with the nutritional labels. If you didn’t list the grams of sugar in the glazed walnuts recipe, I would have disregarded the recipe assuming it was too high in sugar, which clearly it is not. I love your site, and have told others about it. Thanks helping me on my quest of healthy living.

    Sally Cameron | 11/16/2015 at 8:59 am

    Thanks Anne! You are exactly right with this recipe and the sugar. Thanks for the kind words and spreading the word on my site. Really trying to gain new readers to help more people live and eat more healthfully.

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