Mushroom and Herb Pasta Sauce

By Sally on January 22, 2012

fish & shellfish, pasta, sauces and condiments, the daniel plan, vegan, vegetarian,

5 Comments

Mushroom Marinara Linguine

This is an amazing tasting sauce with a rich and hearty flavor.  My favorite pasta sauce. A recipe I thought I’d save for a future cookbook. But it seemed the right thing to share with you now.

Marvelous Mushrooms

I’m crazy about mushrooms. For years I have made a mushroom pasta sauce, or mushroom marinara, that uses lots of parsley and other herbs. A staple in my house for years, I used to make double batches and freeze it in jars because we ate it so much. It was always handy for a quick and satisfying dinner.

What To Do With Parsley

Cleaning out the vegetable drawer I somehow ended the week with three big bunches of parsley. Fresh, fluffy, green, organic flat-leaf parsley. It was too good to be ignored, allowed to wilt away and get tossed. How to use it? Making my favorite pasta sauce.

Always a bridesmaid but never the bride, parsley is often relegated to the role of supporting actor as simple garnish. In this recipe, parsley plays the foundational role for my mushroom and herb pasta sauce. The parsley lends fresh herbal flavor to this meatless but meaty-tasting sauce filled with mushrooms, tomatoes, garlic, onion, celery and herbs.

Prep Your Vegetables

For fast prep work, a food processor comes in handy. If you have one but don’t use it much, here is your chance to put it to use. You can also prep the vegetables by hand with a chef’s knife.

Strip leaves from two to three large bunches of parsley, discarding the stems. Wash parsley leaves in cool water and dry on layers of paper towels, kitchen towels or in a salad spinner.

Chop the parsley leaves fine. You can use a food processor, pulsing with the steel knife, or chop by hand. Next, slice the mushrooms (good old white mushrooms work fine) and chop some celery. The mushrooms I slice thin in my food processor with the slicing blade. The celery and onions I chop finely by hand.

Simmer and Enjoy

Once your prep work is done, the sauce is easy to complete by simmering the ingredients in a pot until thick and the flavors are melded together. Serve it simply over pasta noodles for an easy, healthy dinner. Use it to top stuffed pasta shells. It’s great, too, for topping crisp chicken cutlets with a side of broccolini. It’s a versatile sauce, and extra freezes well.

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5 Comments

Leave a Comment
Cathy @What Would Cathy Eat? | January 23, 2012 at 9:30 am

Wow, love the massive amount of parsley. I make marinara sauce all the time but want to try your version tonight! I will use Pomi tomatoes, as I stopped using canned tomatoes because of the BPA. (Muir Glen ones don’t have BPA but I don’t love them.)

    Sally | January 23, 2012 at 3:58 pm

    Hi Cathy. Yep, Muir Glen brand is what I used. I’m always careful too about BPA. Good tip on the Pomi. I’ll have to try them. Thanks!

    Note for readers – If you are not familiar with BPA, it stands for Bisphenol A. BPA is an industrial chemical that has been used to make certain plastics and resins since the 1960s. It’s often used in the linings of cans. There are many concerns about it. To read more, try this link.http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/bpa/AN01955

Gloria | January 26, 2012 at 9:22 pm

I have mushrooms and parsley in the frigde. Your sauce looks delicious. Looking forward to trying this.

Sally | January 28, 2012 at 3:50 pm

I love the sound of all that parsley–one of the few things that you can find all year round. I am definitely putting this on my list to make soon, especially when we want something lighter than the Bolognese sauce I squirrel away in the freezer for those emergency nights when I want something quick. Oh wait, that’s most nights–I need this. I’ve used the Pomi diced tomatoes and prefer them to Muir Glen simply because they break down more easily, good for when you don’t want discrete chunks of tomatoes that won’t melt into the sauce.

LJP | February 29, 2012 at 7:18 pm

I think that parsley is a very underrated ingredient. I will try this v. soon!

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